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10 | JULY 2017 | OHIO STYLIST & SALON |

WWW.OHIOSTYLIST.COM

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Beyond Your Chair

Jayne Morehouse

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HERE

Create a Network that WorksWith and For You

Building bridges in your community through

networking is your single most important market-

ing initiative.

Not only does it help you spread the word

about your business, as well as the services and

products you provide, but it yields the biggest

return in new clients, team morale and the positive

impact on your salon’s reputation for the smallest

monetary investment.

In addition, it can create a support network that

helps you feel more successful, more confident

and more fulfilled with your career.

I have built my agency 100 percent through

networking. As a result, every new client I meet

comes through a personal referral from my net-

work. In fact, I’m writing this column as a result of

networking with Lisa Kind,

The Stylist’s

owner, at

trade shows and via email. I truly enjoy working

with great people and introducing them to one an-

other for mutual benefit, and the value this service

provides to my marketing/public relations agency

is truly priceless.

To make networking work for you, your goal is

to offer something of value for participation —

without expecting anything in return. Many times,

that’s as simple as sharing your best styling tips,

trends information, consultative information or

business advice. However, there’s one caveat: If you

find that you’re the one always giving and sharing

and the people you’re networking with are always

taking, it might be time to move on to other peo-

ple who want to give more than they receive. Here

are some ways to get started that won’t even seem

like you are working.

• Follow your passions.

People like to do busi-

ness with people they like, so create opportuni-

ties to network with people who share common

interests. If you love animals, consider volunteering

for a local rescue. If you’re a budding chef, take a

cooking class. Join a running group, a yoga class

or a Pilates studio. Become active in your place of

worship. At the same time, join related groups on-

line and engage with people who appear to be the

leaders in your community on Facebook, Twitter

and Instagram. All of these give you opportunities

to meet new people who will love to try your ser-

vices once you bond over your common passions.

Connect with your local business com-

munity.

Every small community to big city has

numerous organizations designed specifically for

business networking. How do you know which is

the best for you? Ask your clients (specifically the

clients who are the most loyal and spend the most

dollars with you) what groups they belong to. Your

goal is to network where your targeted client base

already is. Then attract them to your chair with

your positive, open and sharing approach to them.