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14 | APRIL 2017 | CALIFORNIA STYLIST & SALON |

WWW.CALIFORNIASTYLIST.COM

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Three Rules To Pricing Color Services

We work in the era of choice.

Unicorn locks, mermaid waves;

complex color jobs are becoming

the new norm.

Every salon you walk into has colorists trained

to work magic with dozens of techniques, multiple

color options and methods right at their finger-

tips. The downside of

these choices, though, is

knowing exactly what to

charge.

Clients that request

complex color methods

often don’t understand

the amount of effort and

product that goes into creating their beautiful looks.

When it comes time to update their fading color,

some get frustrated they must pay again. So, what

should you charge and, more importantly, how can

you show clients the investment is worth it?

Pricing for your services, all your services, is im-

portant. Once you start down the path of discounts,

price reductions, bundling, caving to customers

whining, etc. you set yourself up for future night-

mares. It’s best to stick to the following three rules:

Know your prices and

stick

to them.

Before

you see your next client, you should be clear about

what you charge for each service. If you are doing

a full highlight, then charge for a full highlight. If

that price normally includes one color and you are

now using three or four then you should be charg-

ing extra per color used.

Now that doesn’t mean that you should go

crazy. If you normally use about four ounces of

color to complete a full head of highlights and you

are now using six ounces

then you should charge

for that extra tube of

color. The service time

didn’t increase but the

amount of product for

the service did and you

should charge for that.

Typically, additional color charges are double the

cost of the product. If a tube and developer costs

you about $10 then you should add $20 to the

service.

Be

crystal

clear with your client.

That means

you should conduct a thorough consultation and

explain the process and the price before you even

start. It is also critical you explain the post services,

the necessary color safe products and the frequen-

Pricing for your services, all your services,

is important. Once you start down the

path of discounts, price reductions, bun-

dling, caving to customers whining, etc.

you set yourself up for future nightmares.